March 25, 2017

To Train or Not to Train Is the Question – Part 1

“We need training!” These three words are likely stated in repeated glory as much as any often-used phrase in business cultures. I’ve heard it proclaimed from individuals including administrative assistants, functional subject matter experts, HR generalists, managers and executives—even training professionals!

In fact, when I hear those words I’m reminded of one of my least-liked graduate school professors. While I wasn’t a fan of his approach or attitude, I must credit him for providing our class with the single rebuttal I would use time and time again—“Is training the real need?” Try using it the next time you hear the aforementioned declaration of blame. And while watching the other person’s facial expression change to pondering or thwarted, you’ll have a few seconds to counter again with meaningful suggestions to help discover what’s really affecting productivity. Here are just a few …

  • Have we asked the people closest to the process for their input?
  • Do we truly know that a significant percentage of users are lacking the necessary knowledge or skills?
  • Do we even know where exactly the root cause problem lies?

Your transmission is not really broken…

Consider automobile repair as an analogy. Have you had those few, yet joyous, occasions where your trusted technician delivered the outstanding news that your car would only need a $79 repair when you expected it to be hundreds, or maybe thousands of dollars? The reason that happened is based on a few simple truths—a trusted resource looking in the right places with the right diagnostic tools to find the actual problem; not disassembling the entire transmission and replacing all the inner parts when an inexpensive sensor was the actual culprit.

In technology-based change user adoption of the tool of choice or related processes is a broad and potentially expensive symptom of what might be a more straightforward problem. Declaring that users aren’t well-trained infers that a lack of knowledge or skills is the direct and only contributor to low adoption. But is that the real root cause of the adoption gap? For our automobile analogy, a major undertaking of training would equate to the extensive transmission repair. Many companies decide quickly that training is the problem, reassign resources or hire in new ones, build elaborate strategies and plans, require a large portion of the work force to attend training on multiple topics, spending tens or hundreds of thousands of dollars…only not to solve the underlying problem causing the low adoption.

In tomorrow’s blog we’ll discuss two potential underlying problems and solutions to increase adoption without making ‘lack of training’ the scapegoat.

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alan.crean@changepoint.com' About Alan Crean

Alan Crean is SME in Lead 2 Cash in Professional Services and SME in PPM & Resource Management within IT Shared Services Organizations. Subject Matter Expert in Professional Services Automation with a particular focus on supporting the Lead to Cash process for Technology based Professional Services and Consulting firms.